Facing Your Fears
Oct28

Facing Your Fears

Fear is the uneasy feeling that we are inadequate. It is an alarm that goes off when we feel threatened. It keeps people from the attainment of their goals. I’m not talking about normal, natural fears—such as the fear of falling or the fear of walking onto a busy highway. I’m talking about a gripping, paralyzing fear that is truly a spirit of fear. Paul wrote to Timothy, “God has not given us a spirit of timidity, but of power and love and discipline” (2 Tim. 1:7). Let me give you an example of this type of fear. Imagine a person who believes strongly that the Lord desires him to take a new job. He starts with confidence and enthusiasm. Soon he realizes that has much to learn about how to succeed in this new role. The whole project begins to seem insurmountable and overwhelming. He begins to take to heart the criticism of others. He feels as if he is a failure and will never succeed at this new position. He says, “I don’t have what it takes. I’m scared of taking any more risks.” The longer that trend in thinking goes unchecked, the more he moves in to sheer panic until he just wants to flee completely. Fear wins out and he does not accomplish God’s goal for his life. When fear strikes you, face fear head-on. Ask yourself, What am I really afraid of? Break down the nature of your fear. Are you afraid of failure that will lead to criticism? Are you afraid of failure that will lead to rejection from someone you love or admire? Are you afraid that your weaknesses and inadequacies will be exposed? Are you afraid that others will withdraw from you or perhaps even punish you? Admit the fears to yourself and to God. And at times, you may be wise to admit the fears to others. Then turn immediately to the matter of your faith. Faith is the solution for fear. Do things that build up your faith. The first and best move you can make to build up your faith is to get your eyes off your problem and off yourself and onto Jesus. He is the Source of all your supply. He is utterly reliable and possesses all knowledge and all authority. Speak aloud the words of Hebrews 13:6 until they sink deep within your spirit: “The Lord is my helper; I will not fear. What can man do to me?” People may criticize, reject, ridicule and persecute, but they can’t take away your salvation, your relationship with Jesus Christ, your eternal home in heaven, or the joy, contentment, and inner strength...

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Why athletes go broke: The myth of the dumb jock
Jul04

Why athletes go broke: The myth of the dumb jock

(MoneyWatch) Did you hear about the professional athlete who just declared bankruptcy? Of course you have. Because when it comes to professional athletes and money, we tend to only hear about how large their new contract is worth or how much they just lost — and unfortunately there is no shortage of examples of the latter. A Sports Illustrated article reports the grim statistics — 78 percent ofNFL players face bankruptcy or serious financial stress within just two years of leaving the game and 60 percent of NBA players face the same dire results in five years. While the statistics are not in dispute, the reasons why so many athletes face financial problems are. Often it boils down to the “dumb jock” stereotype — these guys are superstars on the field but completely clueless off. Sure, that may explain some of the athletes that have gone broke, but this is not a valid or useful explanation of why so many professional athletes end up broke. In fact, NFL players score above average on intelligence measures. Many professional athletes suffer financial problems — not because they aren’t smart — but for a number of more nuanced reasons. In my work managing the finances of sudden wealth recipients and advising professional athletes, the best way to help is to overcome the common barriers that prevent windfall recipients from doing the right thing. Here are a few issues, any one of which can wreak havoc on one’s finances, that are common to the professional athlete: Trust issues. Think Goldilocks. Too much or too little can be a problem. For the athlete that doesn’t trust anyone, he won’t be open to good tax, legal, and financial advice that could protect his wealth and ensure a lifetime of financial stability. On the other hand, more than a few professional athletes have been duped, taken advantage of, or downright defrauded because they blindly trusted a smooth talking “suit.” A newly announced financial helpline by the NFL Player’s Association aims to address this very issue. Liz Davidson, CEO of Financial Finesseand the company supporting the helpline says, “This program gives players a strong base to build upon, and that with the continued growth of their financial education initiatives, players will continue to progress financially.” Wired differently. It’s pretty easy to spot a professional athlete in a lineup. Physically they are quite different from you and me. But psychologically they may be different as well. Research found significant differences between athletes and non-athletes across personality characteristics such as inhibition, emotionality, and aggressiveness. Good characteristics on the field, but not necessarily optimum for making financial decisions. Today focus. Research published in the Journal of Judgment and Decision Making shows...

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Living conscious of God’s love
Jul03

Living conscious of God’s love

“And Saul sought to pin David to the wall with the spear, but he eluded Saul, so that he struck the spear into the wall. And David fled and escaped the night.” 1 Samuel 19:12 I’ve dislocated my knee twice while playing basketball. What’s just as frustrating as the dislocation itself, however, is what happens to the quad muscle after the injury. It shuts down. In order to get back out on the basketball court, even after two surgeries fixed my knee cap, I had to hook an electric stimulator up to my quad multiple times a day, for several weeks straight, just to fire up the muscle again. It was as if my quad completely forgot how to function, even after the surgery. It was as if my quad muscle, which functioned perfectly ever since I learned to walk, suddenly forgot the way it worked before. Sometimes, I think our hearts work the same way. Consider David. In 1 Samuel, we read about how “the Lord was with him” and protected him as Saul did everything he could to kill him. And yet, later in David’s life, he lusts upon Bathsheba, tries to cover it up, and suffers a monstrous fall. It’s as if he forgot how much God loved and protected him in his past. He forgot how to walk. He was spiritually unconscious. As our series on 1 Samuel continues this issue and we read about Saul’s pursuit of David and God’s protection of David, think about the blessings God has bestowed upon you in your past. Are you living conscious of His love? Or have you forgotten the very thing at the core of your being—the fact you are loved? http://www.sportsspectrum.com/articles/ Originally Posted by: Stephen...

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How to respond to someone’s comment’s on Facebook… Must READ!
Jun10

How to respond to someone’s comment’s on Facebook… Must READ!

I recently heard of something that happened on Facebook. A girl posted about New Years Day, saying “People always make New Year’s Resolutions, but let’s face it, none of us are going to keep ours.” How would you respond to a statement like that? Some people posted back in agreement, and the poster had a lot of likes. But one of the poster’s 375 “friends” had just made a New Year’s Resolution to go back to the gym. She really wanted to keep it, and was a kind of “up” and bubbly person, so that comment really got to her. This girl (we’ll call her Jena) simply posted back “Ew”. In other words, Jena had read this negative comment, had felt it strike her wrongly, and she posted her feelings about it: “Ew.”  It turns out things had gotten a little tense between the girl and Jena lately. They were in the same math class … no words had been exchanged, just a few dirty looks that probably started with mutual jealousy. The first girl posted back to Jena, “I hear you’re switching high schools. Is it because you don’t have any friends at this school?” What she didn’t realise was Jena’s dad had serious surgery the year before, and they were moving so he could live in a house that didn’t have as many stairs. Switching schools was causing the whole family a tremendous stress. The point is, this Facebook war mushroomed into something that involved three days of posts, over 160 people from 5 different communities and 3 different schools. Some would argue it all started with just TWO LITTLE LETTERS: E-W. Ew. With that story in mind, here’s four principles to help us be godly Facebookers. 1. Your online behaviour reflects your offline attitudes Philippians 4:8 says, “whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.”  You can’t say, and you can’t post, what you’re not thinking about. So before your write something on Facebook, imagine how others might respond to what are you saying. How do think they will feel? Good? Or Bad? If you think there’s a chance they will take it negatively, maybe you shouldn’t post it. Posting and texting is just like any other area of life. In Matthew 7:12 Jesus states clearly, “So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets.” This ‘Golden Rule’ sums up almost every other command in the Bible. 2. Avoid online negativity This principle is like a subcategory of the first. If you say something negative about a person,...

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Will You Deny Me..? Or Claim Me..?
Jun07

Will You Deny Me..? Or Claim Me..?

Jesus said, “But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven” (Matt. 10:33). What did He mean by this statement? Can you deny Christ and not realize it? Read this article to find out the truth. Many martyrs gave up their lives for refusing to deny Christ. “They loved not their lives unto the death.” But, what did Jesus say about those who reject or deny His word? He said those who deny Him will be denied before the Father in heaven. What did Christ mean by these remarks? Christ Was the Spokesman Christ, the Son of God, appeared on this Earth as a physical human being. Isaiah prophesied, “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace” (Isa. 9:6). Other Old Testament prophecies anticipated the appearance of the Messiah. Prior to His human birth, Christ was the God of the Old Testament (1Cor. 10:1-4). His appearance and sacrifice were part of God’s redemption plan for mankind. Jesus Christ was the propitiatory sacrifice needed to take away the sins of the world (John 3:16; 6:51; 12:27, Matt. 20:28, Heb. 2:9, 14-15, 18). Jesus brought the message of salvation to mankind, the spiritual truth of the New Testament dispensation (Heb. 1:2, John 1:17). As the Logos or Spokesman, Jesus Christ was the Word of God personified. Along with the Father, He existed from the beginning. He was the true Light who brought spiritual enlightenment to the world (John 1:1-3, 7-9). He said, “. . . I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me” (John 14:6). Salvation to mankind came through Christ alone (John 10:7-9, Acts 4:12). He alone brought the way to eternal life (Luke 1:78-79). He was God in the flesh who dwelt among us (John 1:14). Jesus set the perfect example for us to follow. He did not live a perfect life in our stead; rather, he came to die in our stead. His perfect life exemplified the kind of behavior and conduct we should manifest. He revealed the complete spiritual manifestation of God’s Law for us to follow. He filled to the full or magnified the spiritual intent of God’s law (Isa. 42:21). Meaning of the Word Must Be Revealed To come to accept and really believe in Christ is contingent upon a divine call from God, the Father. Jesus said, “No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him:...

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